What started the second wave of the women’s rights movement in the 1960s quizlet?

What inspired the second wave of the women’s movement?

This movement was triggered by the publishing of Betty Friedan’s book, The Feminine Mystique, a renowned feminist text credited for daring to break social conventions regarding the portrayal of women. Friedan was inspired by Simone de Beauvoir’s book, The Second Sex, first published in Paris in 1949.

Why did a second wave of feminism begin in the 1960s?

The second wave of feminism in the United States came as a delayed reaction against the renewed domesticity of women after World War II: the late 1940s post-war boom, which was an era characterized by an unprecedented economic growth, a baby boom, a move to family-oriented suburbs and the ideal of companionate …

When was the second wave of the women’s rights movement?

The women’s movement of the 1960s and ’70s, the so-called “second wave” of feminism, represented a seemingly abrupt break with the tranquil suburban life pictured in American popular culture.

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Who started the women’s rights movement in 1960s?

It commemorates three founders of America’s women’s suffrage movement: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucretia Mott.

How did the women’s movement of the 1960s begin?

During the 1960s, influenced and inspired by the Civil Rights Movement, women of all ages began to fight to secure a stronger role in American society. … Title VII is the section of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that prohibited discrimination in employment on the basis of gender.

What did the second wave feminist movement accomplish?

Achievements of the Second Wave

It was the first federal law to address sex discrimination. … In 1974, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) became law; it banned discrimination in access to credit on the basis of sex or marital status and was later amended to include race, religion, national origin, and age.

What caused women’s rights movement?

In the early 1800s many activists who believed in abolishing slavery decided to support women’s suffrage as well. A growing push for women’s rights, including suffrage, emerged from the political activism of such figures as Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Sojourner Truth, Lucy Stone, Susan B. …

Where did second wave feminism start?

The second wave feminism movement took place in the 1960s and 1970s and focused on issues of equality and discrimination. Starting initially in the United States with American women, the feminist liberation movement soon spread to other Western countries.

Was Simone de Beauvoir The second wave feminism?

There were prominent feminist thinkers before Friedan who would come to be associated with the second wave — most importantly Simone de Beauvoir, whose Second Sex came out in France in 1949 and in the US in 1953 — but The Feminine Mystique was a phenomenon.

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What is 1st 2nd and 3rd wave feminism?

The key difference between first second and third wave feminism is that the first wave feminism was mainly about suffrage, and the second wave feminism was about reproductive rights, whereas the third wave feminism was about female heteronormality. … Meanwhile, the third wave started during the 1990s.

What was the women’s movement in the 1960’s?

women’s rights movement, also called women’s liberation movement, diverse social movement, largely based in the United States, that in the 1960s and ’70s sought equal rights and opportunities and greater personal freedom for women. It coincided with and is recognized as part of the “second wave” of feminism.

What did the women’s rights movement accomplish during the 1960s?

Today the gains of the feminist movement — women’s equal access to education, their increased participation in politics and the workplace, their access to abortion and birth control, the existence of resources to aid domestic violence and rape victims, and the legal protection of women’s rights — are often taken for …

What were women’s rights in the 1960s?

Gradually, Americans came to accept some of the basic goals of the Sixties feminists: equal pay for equal work, an end to domestic violence, curtailment of severe limits on women in managerial jobs, an end to sexual harassment, and sharing of responsibility for housework and child rearing. .