Best answer: What divided women’s suffrage groups over the 15th Amendment?

The American Equal Rights Association dissolved after the 1869 meeting and the women’s rights movement split into two distinct groups, never reuniting again during the 19th century.

Why did the women’s suffrage movement split over the 15th Amendment?

The Divide

After the Civil War, the women’s suffrage movement split into two factions over the 15th Amendment. … They assumed that the rights of women would be championed alongside the rights of black men and they opposed the Amendment on the basis of women’s exclusion.

What divided the women’s suffrage movement?

Disagreements over the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments and the relationship between women’s suffrage and the movement for racial equality split the women’s rights movement with allegiances divided between two main organizations: the National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association.

What caused a split in the women’s suffrage movement?

The split in the women’s suffrage campaign occurred when politicians drafted and proposed the 15th Amendment which gave black men the right to vote but didn’t include black and white women in the proposed legislation. Some women’s suffragists, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B.

What split the women’s suffrage movement after the Civil War?

After the Civil War, women’s rights supporters split over whether they should push to include women in the 15th Amendment, which extended voting rights to African American men. In 1869, two competing organizations emerged, each with its own strategies and goals.

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Who opposed the 15th Amendment?

Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who opposed the amendment, and the American Woman Suffrage Association of Lucy Stone and Henry Browne Blackwell, who supported it. The two groups remained divided until the 1890s.

Who did the 15th Amendment benefit?

The 15th Amendment guaranteed African-American men the right to vote. Almost immediately after ratification, African Americans began to take part in running for office and voting.